PFW Highlights: DAY 5

4:22 AM

 Paris Fashion Week is here and we are so excited! And of course we are here to inform you about all the latest news as well as all the highlights from the runways, the front-row and the after parties! Stay tuned for daily updates! Check the previous days (DAY 1DAY 2DAY 3DAY 4)

DAY 5

The first thing we noticed on the Haicker Ackerman runway was probably the gloves -which seem to make a huge comeback-. Other than that his show was an ode to every print possible, from dotted leopard to the variations between chekered and tweed. We definetely loved the heavy looking dark outwear mixed with airy details, like the scarves, which created the most beautiful and contadictory canvas for his prints of choice. David Koma took his own turn to the new age bodycon dress at the Mugler show. With simple lines, beautiful cuts and leather details the collections was based on simple minimalism with hints that accented the female figure beautifully.


 





Olympia Le Tan's inspiration was kind of obvious and maybe not really unique. Her approach though on the theme of choice -which was ballerinas- was really amazing and so beautifully executed that it made it hard not to love it. With little defining details, like her choice of fabrics and the few prints on the kind-of-tutu skirts, Le Tan's collection was balancing between the innocent and girly preppy and the -almost- conservative office day look. At the Vivienne Westwood show things were even more complicated with subjects like climate change or even bisexuality being on the forefront. The, apparently, unisex collection stood out for its morality rather than the outfits presented, which appeared to despise all the stereotypes regarding the appropriate clothing that brings out the shape in both the male and the female figure.


Next up the really complicated and artistic collections of Junya Watanabe and Rey Kawakubo for Comme des Garcons. The first one looked more like a riddle rather than a fashion statement with minimal geometry and dimentionality being the key points of the show. At Kawakubo's runway there was a mixture of feelings; between joy and grief -depending on the design and colour- the cushion-like pieces of art were twisted and turned in such a unique way that excessive embelissments weren't even needed.




Elie Saab prooved once again that he can do it all. This season he chose leaf prints which complemented the transparencies they were embossed on. From the high waisted pants to the different styled mini and maxi dresses, everything had the classic feminine-yet-sexy Elie Saab style (which I personally love). The smokey eyes, mostly dark colour palette as well as the leather and fury details were all those things that made this show even more amazing and season-appropriate than it already was. Guillaume Henry took things one step further at the Nina Ricci show. With a different type of trasparencies, voluminous outwear, furs and fringes, this collection had a different, almost boyish, take on the feminine style of the house. We certainly loved the different materials used as well as the few total sparkly dresses which shaked things up a bit.

 


Veronique Leroy's show had the amazing quality of being strictly structured but in such a way that brought peace to our inner OCD thoughts. Pleats were basically everywhere, along with the colars and turtlenecks that completed the looks. Key points of the show certainly must have been this amazing azzure blue in most of the outfits as well as the precise cuts and the dramatic, graphic liners. Acne Studios sticked to the classics with tweed being everywhere, warm toned orange brown being the basic theme of the colour palette and the outwear drawing the most attention during the show. Prints and suturing came together to create amazing outfits. We particularly loved the fresh take of the classic leather biker jacket.



And because a fashion week is nothing without its streetstylers:









All the photo from the fashion shows are courtesy of style.com,
Streetstyle photos by globalblue.com & company.co.uk


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